Book Review: Will Haunt You by Brian Kirk

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You don’t read the book. It reads you. 

Release Date: March 14, 2019

Purchase on Amazon

Price: $11.91 (paperback)

Publisher: Flame Tree Press

Plot Summary:

Rumors of a deadly book have been floating around the dark corners of the deep web. A disturbing tale about a mysterious figure who preys on those who read the book and subjects them to a world of personalized terror.

Jesse Wheeler―former guitarist of the heavy metal group The Rising Dead―was quick to discount the ominous folklore associated with the book. It takes more than some urban legend to frighten him. Hell, reality is scary enough. Seven years ago his greatest responsibility was the nightly guitar solo. Then one night when Jesse was blackout drunk, he accidentally injured his son, leaving him permanently disabled. Dreams of being a rock star died when he destroyed his son’s future. Now he cuts radio jingles and fights to stay clean.

But Jesse is wrong. The legend is real―and tonight he will become the protagonist in an elaborate scheme specifically tailored to prey on his fears and resurrect the ghosts from his past. Jesse is not the only one in danger, however. By reading the book, you have volunteered to participate in the author’s deadly game, with every page drawing you closer to your own personalized nightmare. The real horror doesn’t begin until you reach the end.

That’s when the evil comes for you.

Grade: A

Review:

Let me start off this review by saying that this book is creepy. But not creepy in the slow burn atmospheric way that The Exorcism of Emily Rose was (or A Head full of Ghosts at its best before the dismal downfall of an ending), but rather it’s creepy in the way that only Rob Zombie and Eli Roth movies know how to be. Meaning, we’re creeped out because we can envision these horrors happening to us, and we squirm and wish that we could do something to save the protagonist. And yet, we’re also kinda worried for our well being, after all the book is about a cursed book, and the cursed book in question is the one you’re holding in your hands right now. Don’t have chills yet?

Now, if you’re not a fan of Rob Zombie films, I can see how this may not be the kind of horror book for you. This book was very much reminiscent of Zombie’s newest film, 31, with its bizarro villains, and the location of being enclosed in one of the creepiest mansions known to man.

I’m not sure why I have a penchant for has-been rock star stories (of any genre), but when it’s combined with a cursed book, it just amps up the interest level for me. This book has you questioning everything and everybody, but mostly it will leave you wondering who are the real monsters, the others? Or yourself?

Must read for those who love strange, gory tales with a writing style of an enraged demon on speed.

*Thank you so much to NetGalley and Flame Tree Press for the digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

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3 Symbols You Missed While Watching Hereditary

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After the family matriarch passes away, a grieving family is haunted by tragic and disturbing occurrences, and begin to unravel dark secrets.

*SPOILERS ALERT* if you have not seen the movie yet, DO NOT read further!

Hereditary is Ari Aster’s first feature film, hailed as the “scariest horror movie of the year”. The film is packed with unsettling visuals and a creepy atmosphere. The movie sees a superb Toni Collette as the troubled Annie, who has to deal with the recent passing of her mother. But as viewers will soon see, it isn’t that death that is the catalyst moment of the movie, but rather a second more dramatic death that occurs shortly, that of daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro). This second death is the one that begins to tear the family apart at the seams, pitting Annie against her son Peter (Alex Wolff), and husband Steve (Gabriel Byrne).

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The movie is riddled with symbols and foreshadowing galore. During a class discussion about the flaws of Greek mythology Heracles, a student states: “The characters are all just pawns in this horrible hopelessness.” Which heavily foreshadows how every single character in this movie are simply just pawns of King Paimon, and that they will all be met with tragic deaths.

Here are THREE SYMBOLS that you may have missed whilst watching the movie:

001. Chocolate – Back in the early 1600’s, chocolate was referred to as the Devil’s elixir, hence where the name for the famous chocolate on chocolate cake comes from, Devil’s Food Cake. This symbol is used from the very beginning in the movie, suggesting that Charlie may already have been possessed by King Paimon (one of Hell’s kings) or just a foreshadowing that she will be possessed.

002. The Red Doorknob – Charlie’s room has a red doorknob, similar to the one shown in The Sixth Sense, symbolizing the presence of spirits or possible spirit possessions.

003. King Paimon’s Symbol – This is present from the very beginning of the movie, first seen as a pendant that Annie’s mother is wearing whilst in the casket at the funeral. Another instance where we see this symbol is on the pole that decapitates Charlie the night of the accident, as well as in Joan’s home after she has placed a curse on Annie’s family, and also in blood on the roof of the attic where Annie’s mother’s body has been placed. Lastly, at the very end, when the audience finally sees the idol representation of King Paimon, wearing that same symbol.

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Have you seen this movie? What did you think? Let me know below!

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Review: Channel Zero – No-End House

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Much like American Horror Story, Channel Zero is a horror anthology series which each season differing from another. Last year, it was Channel Zero: Candle Cove, this year SyFy series returned with Channel Zero: No-End House. Unlike other series that are either based off of books, original screenplays, or graphic novels, this series is based off of Internet-borne stories infamously known as creepypasta (they’re the sames stories that birthed the legend of Slender Man). Unlike American Horror Story, Channel Zero gives a seriously dose of creepy vibes with its visceral, almost nightmare-inducing visuals.

Channel Zero: No-End House is centered upon a haunted house. But this haunted house is unlike any other you’ve ever been in as entering all six rooms will leave you emotionally disturbed (if you even make it through to the other side). The show centers around the protagonist, Margot (Amy Forsyth) a young woman who’s still dealing with the untimely death of her father (John Carroll Lynch). One night, her best friend Jules (Aisha Dee) proposes to go out for the night to help pull her friend out of her dark spot. The two end up in a bar where they meet fellow friend J.D. (Seamus Patterson) and alluring new boy Seth (Jeff Ward) who dare the girls to join them to walk through a haunted house infamous for leaving anyone who enters it utterly disturbed. The two friends agree, and once they enter the house that’s when things go awry.

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What follows isn’t necessarily outwardly disturbing per se at first glance, only that the final room of the house brings the group to a neighborhood, much like the one they’re from (almost like an alternate universe of sorts) only that the people who inhabit that place may look like your loved ones, but are far from being those people. (Such as the protagonist Margot seeing her father living there and he’s alive, when in her world he’s dead). At first glance, the people inhabiting the house may appear innocuous but they actually harbor a dark secret. Mere food doesn’t nourish these creatures, rather they feed off of someone’s memories (quite literally, as your memories manifest into either a person or pet and the house’s inhabitants tear into them, devouring every morsel of your past).

The show was directed by Steven Piet (known mostly for the crime mystery Uncle John on Netflix). Channel Zero: No-End House is full of long pans such as the film It Follows, not quite revealing to the viewer right away what exactly it is that we need to be paying attention to. There’s a strange sense of dread in every scene, and the suspense and terror is palpable. The viewer is filled with a terrible sense of unease throughout the whole series, and for some of you less brave folks out there, you may need to sleep with the light on once you’re through with this.

By: Azzurra Nox